Interesting facts on hummingbirds.

May 17, 2011 at 10:02 AM Leave a comment

Hummingbirds get the energy they need to maintain their astonishing metabolism primarily from flower nectar and the sugar water they find at feeders (here’s the recipe). For protein and other nutrients, they also eat soft-bodied insects and spiders; I like Bob Sargent’s perspective: “Hummers need nectar to power the bug eating machine that they are.” Think of them as miniature flycatchers, and sugar is just the fuel for getting their real nourishment. You might try setting out some overripe fruit–banana peels are good–to attract flies for your hummers. If you have developed a particularly entertaining method of providing bugs for their dining pleasure, I’d be more than happy to publish it here. 🙂 Meanwhile, let’s talk about nectar feeders, some of which are reviewed on another page.

FeederA Little History…

The device pictured at left is an example of the first commercially-available hummingbird feeder. It was designed by Laurence J. Webster of Boston for his wife, who had read a 1928 National Geographic story about feeding hummers from small glass bottles. Sometime between 1929 and 1935, Webster had his design produced by an MIT lab glassblower (possibly James Ryan). In 1947, National Geographic ran an article by Harold Edgerton about his newly-invented strobe flash, which included photos of hummingbirds at Webster’s feeder. Interest was aroused, and in 1950 the Webster feeder was offered for sale by the Audubon Novelty Company of Medina, NY.

Choosing a Feeder…

Read the entire article here: http://www.hummingbirds.net/feeders.html

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Entry filed under: Green Information, Just for fun..

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